Tuesday, June 23, 2009

Travel tips on terrorist protection and security measures

Tips on traveling safe and secure in a world of terrorist threats.

The papers are full of articles on terrorist abductions. This is one of the best articles I have read on how to remain safe when you travel. I suggest everyone read it and follow the advice.

Johnny Ray
www.sirjohn.org/bloglist

Terrorist Protection and Travel Security Measures

Author: Mark Yates

*Taken from the syllabus of The Law Enforcement & Bodyguard Association International LEBAI, special thanks to former Police Commissioner Norman E. Jennings

The aim of this lesson is to give you an introduction into Travel Security and the need to understand the importance of Travel Security and the role of security while in transit

The reason you need this information is for you to have an understanding as to correct security procedure while travelling in transit

All security personnel must understand and practice the basic rules of individual protection, as you may become the potential victim of a criminal or terrorist organisation or group.

To the extent possible, security operating in personnel in ‘threat areas’ must avoid routine in the routes and times of movements to and from the work site, your place of residence, and around town (i.e. shopping) even to the point of not eating at the same restaurants on a regular basis. Do not become a creature of habit. Past incidents indicate that terrorists kept their victim under surveillance for a substantial period of time to discover patterns and to determine a suitable time(s) and place(s) for the attack. You are vulnerable when on the move and probably most vulnerable walking to and from the car. Terrorists will most likely choose a time you are inside your automobile. You are fixed - and he may attack in a variety of ways.

Make sure the unvaried portions of the route (choke points) are as short as possible. Memorise normal activity. This includes memorising cars that normally park in the area. You can be approximately 80% certain that any attack will occur in a choke point and probably near your home during a routine trip. It is important to remember that you are a better target if you are predictable - the best defence is common sense.

Dr. Mark D. Yates at www.asecurityonestopshop.com teaches the following security measures on his security training programmes.

1. If possible, use different doors and gates when departing and entering your home or office.

2 . When going out, avoid going alone. Try to travel with a group of people. If your SSM or Senior Guard has a two-man rule in place, obey it - there is safety in numbers.

3. Conduct a route survey and look at the choke points from the terrorist’s point of view.

4 . Be aware of your location at all times, even if you are a passenger in a car.

5 . Know the location of police, hospital, military, government and public facilities or other secured areas along your routine routes. These areas can provide a safe haven in case of trouble. Know as much as possible about the stores and merchants along your normal route of travel. Are there pro or anti U.S. sentiments displayed by flags, colours, or slogans painted on the buildings.

6 . In so-far as possible, travel only on busy, well travelled thoroughfares; stay away from isolated back-country roads. You will be advised during your in-country brief by the OIC of dangerous areas, pay heed and avoid them.

7. Be constantly alert to road conditions and surroundings, to include possible surveillance by car, motorcycle, or bicycle. All passengers should be vigilant. If you feel you are being followed or are in danger, drive to the nearest military installation, Police Station or Embassy. Keep the vehicle in the centre of the road to have room to manoeuvre in case of an attack. On multiple lane roads, never drive in the centre lane.

8 . Try to get around road obstructions, utilise a shoulder or ditch. Attempt to crash through a vehicle blockade, if necessary, striking the blocking vehicle a glancing blow, no more than one quarter of the way down its length, preferably at the rear wheels. Keep your vehicle moving at all costs, regardless of its condition: for example, flat tire, disabled cooling system, etc.

9. Be alert for, and give wide berth to, cars or trucks parked along the road, particularly if there are several people around them.

10. Maintain adequate distances between your car and vehicles preceding you. Avoid being blocked in.

11. Never exit the vehicle without checking the area for suspicious individuals. If you are in doubt, drive away.

12. At night, always try to park in a well lit area, of f the street, if possible.

13. Lock the duty vehicle when it is unattended.

14. Parcels and other things should not be left in the car so that strange objects can be spotted quickly.

15. Before entering the duty vehicle, ascertain that there are no suspicious objects or unexplained wires or strings outside, underneath or inside.

16. If you find suspicious wires or packages in the vehicle, do not touch them, report them immediately to the proper authority as outlined in your post guard orders. DO NOT TOUCH THE OBJECT, immediately call for assistance.

17. Keep vehicle in a high state of maintenance at all times. It can be a good weapon if used properly. Vehicles should have: outside rear view mirrors, a locking gas cap, inside hood lock, fire extinguisher, first aid kit, semi metallic disc brake pads, heavy duty shocks, premium radial tires with the maximum tire pressure as printed on the tire side wall, and a vehicle alarm system. Always keep the trunk locked. The gasoline tank should be at least half full at all times. Tinted windows make it difficult for someone to tell who is in the car and where they are sitting.

18. If your vehicle has to be left for any length of time, it should be searched before being used again. Whenever possible have the driver stay with the vehicle to observe it.

19. A full search procedure by the driver should include:

• Looking Carefully Around The Outside Of The Vehicle.

• Looking Through All The Windows.

• Checking Around And Behind Each Wheel.

• Taking Off The Hubcaps.

• Looking Underneath The Car (Particularly The Exhaust And Behind The Gas Tank) -.
• Using An Angled Mirror On A Stick If Available

• Opening The Driver’s Door.

• Checking All Doors Before Opening Them, Seats And Floor

• Opening And Inspecting The Car Trunk.

• Examining The Spare Wheel.

• Checking All Tools.

• Opening Hood Carefully And Examining The Engine Compartment.

During the residential training lessons provided by Dr. Mark D. Yates he suggests your suspicions should be aroused by:

• Unusual Objects.

• Objects Out Of Place.

• Outward Signs Of Tampering.

• Loose Wiring, String, Or Tape.

• Packages Left Under The Vehicle.

• Ground Disturbed Around The Vehicle.

20. Do not leave your vehicle on the street overnight if at all possible and never leave garage doors unlocked. Check garage doors for unknown objects or strings tied to door. DO NOT touch anything that looks strange to you.

21. Never pick up hitchhikers or stop to assist unknown persons in distress. Terrorists have frequently utilised these situations as a trap prior to assault.

22. During travel, always fasten seat belts, keep doors locked and windows closed.

23. Do not permit taxi drivers to deviate from known and desired routes. Do not always use the same taxi or bus stop. Do not take the first available cab.

24. Be sensitive to the possibility of surveillance. Before departing anywhere, check up and down the street for suspicious cars or individuals.

25. Try to note whether you are being followed. If you suspect so, promptly notify your Senior Guard so the incident can be documented.

26. Avoid civil disturbances and disputes with local citizens. If a dispute occurs, distance yourself with it as quickly as possible.

27. Do not unnecessarily divulge your home address, telephone number or any information about your fellow EPO’S.

28. Ensure that your Senior Guard provides you with a list of key phrases in the host country language: I need a policeman; take me to a doctor; where is the hospital; take me to the embassy; help.

29. Learn to use host country telephones.

30. Learn emergency telephone numbers: Embassy; Senior Guard Residence; you should always carry the exact change needed.

31. All mail should be received through the Approved channels.

32. Never accept unsolicited packages.

33. In most cases the VIP will secure some sort of host country identification document to be carried by you at all times, your blood type and allergies to particular medication should be kept with this document and should be bilingual: English and the language of the host country.

34. Identification by belief of importance, not only by the individual, but also from the terrorist’s point of view, can cause you to become a target.

35. All duty rosters should be destroyed, not thrown away when they become obsolete.

36. The best way to keep from being identified and selected as a target is not to say, do, wear, use, or display anything that will help the terrorists identify you as a Foreigner.

37. If you intend to hire domestic help, do so through the Community Liaison Office or (CLO).

38. Do not attract attention to yourself. Keep a low profile. Try to blend in as much as possible.

The measures listed above are not intended to be a complete or a definite list of individual protective measures. You should be able to think of many more. The bottom line here is DO THINK, and always exercise common sense.

SURVEILLANCE

It is a known fact to security specialists that terrorist groups and organised crime groups implement surveillance techniques when choosing a target/s. Dr. Mark D. Yates runs both surveillance and counter surveillance training programmes specifically aligned to countering terrorist attacks and kidnap for ransom incidents. Mark Yates advises all travellers to purchase a kidnap for ransom insurance policy from www.asecurityonestopshop.co.uk prior to leaving your Country of residence.

Your best chance of avoiding a serious terrorist incident is to spot pre-attack surveillance. The surveillance team may not be as professional as the gun team; several mistakes are now common knowledge by prior surveillance teams. The most common area for mistakes that could be noticed by the victim is at the surveillance pick up point. This is where they first begin to follow. The mistake made is correlation. Their movement or actions can be correlated to your movement or actions. The surveillance team is usually too intent on not losing sight of you to realise they are attracting your attention. For instance, as you leave the driveway, you note to the front or rear another car starting to move as you do. The car should be watched carefully. Do not let on that you are suspicious. You can test the suspect vehicle to confirm surveillance. As you depart from home or work, be aware of activity around you. Notice anything that seems suspicious or that may indicate correlation.

Watching for signs of surveillance or attack should be continuous. If, for instance, there is a vehicle behind you in traffic and you notice that is has been there for quite some time, you should make note of the number of people in the car along with their approximate ages. The vehicle may not be anything out of the ordinary. A terrorist would not likely use an eye-catching vehicle.

You must get the vehicle to make another statement. This can be as simple as speeding up just slightly, slowing down, or changing lanes. If the following vehicle does the same, then you have one more piece of information.

If the vehicle has not used several opportunities to pass, but suddenly moves out as if to pass, you should be ready. Take note of the traffic and figure which technique you would use. Watch for the placement of the other vehicle’s occupants, and if the windows are down on the side next to you. If the day is cool or it is raining, this is a very valuable tip. If the vehicle doe’s not complete the pass in the same speed as used in beginning the pass, be ready. Don’t let it stay in your blind spot. Turn and look over your left shoulder. If attacked, or you see weapons, act quickly.

The vehicle in front of you can also conduct surveillance. You can test this vehicle in the same manner as a following vehicle with some additions. Surveillance is normally conducted by the person in the right front seat. The driver cannot glance very often in the rear view mirror without, you becoming suspicious. They know this, so the person in the right front seat does the looking by using the outside right mirror. If you follow a normal vehicle you will not see a face in the out side right mirror as you do in the outside left.

If you do see someone’s face in the right mirror, it is the face of the passenger, meaning the mirror has been adjusted for that person’s use rather than for the driver. At that point you should make the other tests to confirm surveillance, such as changing lanes or speed. You can also easily note correlation by watching the turn signals of the car in front. If you make an unscheduled turn and wait later than normal to activate the turn signal, you will see possible correlations. Do not wait so late that they become suspicious of you. If you believe you are being followed, you should consider the following actions:

Do not reveal to those following that you suspect them. if you do not have radio communications, notify authorities as soon as you arrive at your destination.

If you have communications in the vehicle, notify authorities that you are under surveillance. Give your location, the direction of travel, identifying data of suspected surveillant(s) and your intentions.

Dr. Mark D. Yates advises that you never stop or take other actions to force a confrontation.

Immediately determine any identifying data that you can observe unobtrusively; for example, make, colour of car, licence number, number of occupants, description of occupants, etc.

Normally, existence of surveillance means you are not in danger of being attacked. Consider deviating your route slightly in an apparent normal manner in order to verify that you are being followed. Do not warn the surveillant(s) that you are aware of their presence. Terrorists usually conduct extensive surveillance prior to an attack in order to establish your routine and evaluate your security consciousness. As a rule, surveillance teams are neither trained for, nor have the mission to, assault the potential target.

If you feel you are in danger, immediately drive to the nearest safe area. Do not drive to your home. Be alert for slow-moving motorcycles or bicycles as these could be attempts to slow your car. Drive around them at the first opportunity.

Report all suspected surveillances immediately to the appropriate security office.

A great value for money security purchase is the Dr. Mark D. Yates home study programme on close VIP protection and/or the home study course on anti terrorist driving skills. Both of these written training programmes contain extensive security counter measure information and are available from www.asecurityonestopshop.co.uk

Remember, your goal is to avoid an incident. If you can spot the surveillance, you have an opportunity to feed false information to your attackers. You have an audience, play to them! Show them changes in routine that make an attack very difficult to plan. They will probably go to some other victim since they normally watch several potential victims at the same time; finally picking the one where success is guaranteed.

About the Author:
Business Background of Mark D. Yates: A former Managing Director & CEO of a USA corporation and former MD of two UK Companies. Dr. Mark Yates provides his expertise to a cross section of corporate entities including, Information technology, media, mining, banking and other financial & business institutions, security, law enforcement, construction, sales, marketing, manufacture, banking, film & TV, trade unions, graphic & web design & high income generation E-commerce development & sales. Mark is a very experienced corporate trouble shooter and visionary leader. He effectively handles special assignments and specialises in providing practical solutions to complex business problems. A compulsive achiever who demonstrates the ability to consistently exceed desired results. He is particularly adept in structuring International joint venture businesses and is particularly skilled at identifying new domestic & overseas markets for clients. Now Security specialists who consults for the UK’s largest e-tailer of security products and services

Article Source: ArticlesBase.com - Terrorist Protection and Travel Security Measures

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